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Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Intersectionality

What is Intersectionality

Intersectionality, coined by legal scholar Kimberle Crenshaw in 1989, refers "to the complex and cumulative way that the effects of different forms of discrimination (such as racism, sexism, and classism) combine, overlap, and yes, intersect - especially in the experiences of marginalized people or groups."  - definition from Meriam-Webster

 

For a more detailed explanation check out the Credo Reference section on Intersectionality

Books and Ebooks

Intersectionality

Intersectionality theory has emerged over the past thirty years as a way to think about the avenues by which inequalities (most often dealing with, but not limited to, race, gender, class and sexuality) are produced. Rather than seeing such categories as signaling distinct identities that can be adopted, imposed or rejected, intersectionality theory considers the logic by which each of these categories is socially constructed as well as how they operate within the diffusion of power relations.

Navigating Intersectionality

In an era of political and cultural turmoil, it seems like the United States is more divided than ever along lines of identity. How are our experiences shaped by our race, gender, and class? How do these identities intersect? This textbook will give students in grades 7 to 12 a framework for navigating intersectionality, and understanding how we can use this concept to enrich our understanding of identity, power, and justice in society.

Intersectionality and Social Change

Volume 37 explores the question, what can the emerging discipline of intersectionality studies contribute to our quest to understand and analyze social movements, conflict and change? This collection is part of a continued broadening and deepening of the theoretical contributions of intersectional analysis in understanding social structures and human practices. It lends analytical eye to questions of how race, class, and gender shape strategy and experience in social change processes. It also stretches to include thinking about how analysis of age, religion, or sexual identity can influence the model.

Intersectionality and Higher Education

Though colleges and universities are arguably paying more attention to diversity and inclusion than ever before, to what extent do their efforts result in more socially just campuses? Intersectionality and Higher Education examines how race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, sexual orientation, age, disability, nationality, and other identities connect to produce intersected campus experiences.

Intersectionality

A 2017 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Intersectionality intervenes in the field of intersectionality studies: the integrative examination of the effects of racial, gendered, and class power on people's lives. While "intersectionality" circulates as a buzzword, Anna Carastathis joins other critical voices to urge a more careful reading. Challenging the narratives of arrival that surround it, Carastathis argues that intersectionality is a horizon, illuminating ways of thinking that have yet to be realized.