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First International Track Meet for Women: United States

First International Track Meet for Women, August 20, 1922, in Paris, France.

U.S. Team

Standing, from left: Suzanne Becker, Joseph D'Angola, Camille Sabie, Esther Greene, Lucile Godbold, Louise Van Voorhees, Frances Mead, Kathryn Agar, Maud Rosenbaum, Dr. Harry Eaton Stewart

Sitting, from left: Nancy Van Voorhees, Maybelle Gilliland, Anne Harwick, Elizabeth Stine, Janet Snow

Not pictured: Floreida Batson

Meet the U.S. Team

Kathryn Agar was born on April 3, 1902, in Chicago, Illinois, to James Scanlon and Minnie Adele Dye Agar. James Agar was a very successful packer in Chicago. Kathryn attended the Faulkner School for Girls in Chicago, and Oaksmere. While a student at Oaksmere, Kathryn was a member of the 220-yard relay team that held the American record. At the Oaksmere Meet Kathryn broke the world's record in the javelin throw and finished second in the basketball throw. Her brother, John G. "Jack" Agar played football at the University of Chicago. Her nephew, John Agar, Jr., married Shirley Temple in 1946. In the Paris Meet, she is listed as a competitor in the javelin throw, 60-meter dash, and 100-meters run. Kathryn did not compete in the finals of any event. Kathryn described the night after the Meet: "Last night we just stuffed our selves with cake and candy and stayed out as late as the chaperons would permit. Just imagine fifteen peppy young American girls going to bed at 9 o'clock every night in training for that Olympiad, and not eating sweets more than once a month. We didn't think it was possible, but we felt wonderful." Chicago Daily Tribune, August 22, 1922. Kathryn’s brother, John G. “Jack” Agar played football at the University of Chicago. Kathryn’s nephew, John Agar, Jr., married Shirley Temple in 1946. Kathryn Agar married Wilson Askew Jaicks. Kathryn Agar Jaicks, died in Lake Forest, Illinois, in March 1987.

Frances Janet Snow was born on January 26, 1905, in New York, daughter of Elbridge Gerry Snow, Jr. and Marie Antoinette Snow, of Rye, New York. Janet attended Oaksmere School, in Mamaroneck, New York, where she held the school record in the running broad jump, standing broad jump, and the hop, step, and jump. Janet was also a member of the 220-relay team that held the American record with a time of 28 2/5 seconds. In the Paris Meet she is listed as a contestant in the 100-yard dash but she did not qualify for the finals. Janet married Thomas Irwin Monroe in 1927. Janet later married Reuben Warner, an insurance executive and boyhood friend of F. Scott Fitzgerald. Janet Snow Warner died in Waterbury, Connecticut, in October 1972.

Lucile Ellerbe Godbold was born on May 31, 1900, in Marion County, South Carolina, to William A. and Lucile Godbold of Estill, South Carolina. While a student at Winthrop College (now Winthrop University), Lucile was active in athletics. She broke two World’s records at Winthrop’s 1920 annual track meet. In Winthrop’s 1922 track meet, Lucile won 6 first place ribbons and established a new American record in the shot put. At the Oaksmere meet, Lucile won the basketball throw, placed second in the 100-yard dash and the hop, step, and jump; and set a World's record in the shot put. Lucile was the tallest member of the team at 6 feet tall. In Paris, Lucile set a new World's record in the shot put (best throws with each hand are added together), finished 4th in the 300-meter run, 3rd in the javelin throw, and 4th in the 1000-meter run. Lucile did participate in the exhibition meet after the International meet. She won the triple jump, and placed second in the basketball throw. Lucile was athletic director at Columbia College, Columbia, South Carolina for 58 years. In 1971, the college named its new athletic complex in her honor. Lucile Ellerbe Godbold died in Columbia, South Carolina, on April 5, 1981.

Frances Louise Mead was born on October 16, 1902, in New York City. Frances, daughter of Lawrence J. Mead and Anna Frances Ely Mead, grew up in Tarrytown, New York and in New York City. In 1921, Frances graduated from Rosemary Hall (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Greenwich, Connecticut. Frances’s mother accompanied her to Paris. Frances attended Smith College, majoring in English and completing her junior year in June 1924. On October 11, 1924, she married Mr. Max Henry Hoepli. Frances Mead Hoepli died on September 21, 1966. In an article from the Hampshire Gazette dated October 14, 1922, Frances described the Meet: " ...we arrived at the Pershing Stadium all keyed up for the big test. Some of us, knowing a little French, attempted conversation with other teams. We discovered, that in most cases, this was not their first meet. After the preliminaries there was a pause in the day's activities known as the freshing hour, which we spent in a quaint little inn, where they played the Star Spangled Banner and presented us with an American Flag. Then we were ready to pass in review around the track. Teams from each country marched slowly past the judges and presented their colors during the playing of the various national anthems"

Esther Norton Greene was born on April 5, 1904, in Rochester, New York, to Jay L. and Emma Marie Greene. In 1920, they were civilians who resided in La Boca, Canal Zone, Panama, and Esther was a student at Balboa High School. While a student at Balboa, a newspaper story reported that Esther "was barred from all athletic meets because she has captured so many prizes that those in charge have decided some of the other contestants should be given an opportunity." Esther was a contestant in the 300-meters, but did not compete in the finals. Esther Greene married Alfred W. Moxon. Esther Greene Moxon died in March 1996.

Maud Rosenbaum was born on 13 January 1902, to Mr. Emanuel F. and Maud Yondorf Rosenbaum of Chicago, IL. She attended Oaksmere school. In Spalding's Official Athletic Almanac 1922, Maud is listed as the American record holder and the preparatory school record with a distance of 94' 2" in the basketball throw. Maud also held the Oaksmere School record in the basketball throw and the baseball throw (202' 6"). In competition, best throws with each hand are added together for a final distance. In the Paris Meet, Maude finished third in the shot put with a throw of 57 feet. She was also the team's field manager. In 1927, she married Baron Giorgio di Giacomo Levi in Paris, France and moved to Rome. In 1930, Baroness Maud Levi returned to the United States to play tennis competitively. Her court assets were described in The Literary Digest in August 12, 1933, as being "her chopstroke, volley, ground-covering ability, and net play." Maud won four tennis titles in 1933, including the New York State Tennis Championship. In 1934, the U. S. Tennis Association ranked her a 7th among women's singles players. She divorced the Baron in 1934, and in 1935, married H. Walter Blumenthal of New York City. Maud Blumenthal died on May 3, 1981, in New York City.

Anne Louise Harwick was born on May 13, 1899 in Jacksonville, Florida to William H. and Ellen Teresa Harwick. Anne received a B.S. degree from Florida State College in 1922. While an undergraduate student, she actively participated in college Field Days. In 1922, she won the shot put, javelin throw, standing high jump, walking race and also competed in the hurdles and the baseball throw. In 1921, she won the shot put, set the college record in the javelin throw and baseball throw and placed in the 100-yard dash, and the standing high jump. She graduated holding the college records in the javelin, shot put, and baseball throw. In the Paris Meet, Anne was unable to compete in the javelin throw, an event in which she held the American record, and the shot put due to "overtraining." Anne was able to compete in the 300 meter race. Anne finished third in the first heat, but did not place in the finals. In the exhibition events after the Paris Meet, she won a silver medal in the baseball throw. After graduation Anne worked for one year as assistant director of athletics at Oaksmere School in Mamaroneck, New York. The school was described in publications as having extensive physical education facilities especially for water sports seeing how the school fronted the Oriental Sound. In 1935, after a business career, she served as Assistant Supervisor, Division of Employment, Works Progress Administration for two years. She entered Tulane University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in 1937, and received a Master's of Social Work in 1943. During this time she was working with the Department of Public Welfare and the Housing Authority of New Orleans. She worked for fourteen years as a medical social worker at Blue Ridge Sanatorium in Charlottesville, Virginia. She moved to Boonesville, Virginia in 1967. In 1968, she published Possum Trot, a novel about Florida sharecroppers. Anne Harwick died on April 27, 1974, in Charlottesville and is buried in Boonesville, Virginia.

Louise "Betty" Voorhees, daughter of Dr. James Ditmars Voorhees and Louise Brown Voorhees, was born on May 20, 1904. Her parents were from old New York families and married at the Central Presbyterian Church, New York City, on April 2, 1902. Dr. and Mrs. Voorhees had a son and two daughters: Brown Van Voorhees, Louise, and Nancy, who was her sister’s teammate in Paris. Dr. Voorhees, a notable obstetrical surgeon, died on July 30, 1929, and Louise Brown Voorhees died on January 29, 1958. Louise was educated at the Chaplin’s School in New York City, Rosemary Hall (now Choate Rosemary Hall) in Wallington, CT, and entered Bryn Mawr College, in 1922. Louise was artistic, athletic, and tall at 5 feet 10.5 inches. She studied at the Pratt Institute in New York City and continued her artistic outlets throughout her life through knitting, needlepoint, gardening, working crossword puzzles, and reading. Louise was a life-long tennis player. Louise did not participate in the Oaksmere Meet in Mamaroneck, New York, to join the US team. Louise’s daughter, Susan Sugar, recounts that the coaches at Bryn Mawr, a college with a long history of women’s sports, were asked which student was their best athlete, and they identified Louise. In the Paris Meet, Louise is listed as a competitor in the running high jump. Louise Van Voorhees married Charles E. Kimball on May 31, 1929. Mr. Kimball, son of the last Charels E. Kimball and Mrs. Charles Halsted Maples, graduated from Princeton University in 1913. Mr. Kimball received a law degree from St. Louis University, in St. Louis, Missouri. He practiced law and then worked as a trust officer at the Chemical Bank in Greenwich, Connecticut. Mr. Kimball, artistic in his own right, was a painter. The Kimball’s resided in Greenwich, Connecticut, where they raised three children: Louise Kimball (Ames), Susan Kimball (Sugar), and Charles E. Kimball, Jr. All athletic, the children were encouraged to participate in sports. Forty-seven year old Charles E. Kimball died in March 1938. Louise remarried John R. Webster, headmaster of the Greenwich (CT) County Day School. They had a daughter, Betty Webster. Eighty-nine year old John R. Webster died in May 1993. Louise Voorhees Kimball Webster died in Greenwich, Connecticut, on April 23, 1977. 

Nancy Van Voorhees, daughter of Dr. James Ditmars Voorhees and Louise Brown Voorhees, was born on January 4, 1906. Her parents were from old New York families and were married at the Central Presbyterian Church, New York City, on April 2, 1902. Dr. and Mrs. Voorhees and a son and two daughters: Brown Van Voorhees, Nancy, and Louise, who was her sister’s teammate in Paris. Dr. Voorhees was a noted obstetrician and professor. Nancy attended the Ethel Walker School in Connecticut. At the Oaksmere Meet, Nancy won the running high jump with a jump of 4 feet 7 inches and placed second in the standing broad jump. In the Paris Meet, she is listed as a competitor in the running high jump and the running broad jump. Nancy tied for first place in the running high jump with Carrie Hatt of Great Britain. Nancy married C. Redington Barrett in 1930. Nancy Voorhees Barrett died in June 1988.

Camille Sabie was born on November 25, 1902, in Newark, New Jersey. Camille, daughter of James and Angela Sabie, graduated from East Side High School (Newark, NJ) and the Newark State Normal School (now Kean University). At the Oaksmere meet Camille was on world's record pace in the 100-yard hurdles when she hit the last hurdle. She finished second in the 50-yard dash. In the Paris meet Camille lead the American team with the greatest number of points. She is listed as a competitor in the standing broad jump, 100-yard dash, and a member of the 440-yard relay team. In the trials of the 100-yard hurdles Camille set a world's record and then broke it in the finals. She won the standing broad jump and replaced Nancy Voorhees as a contestant in the running broad jump. Camille won 2nd place in that event. Camille competed in a track and field meet held under the auspices of the Metropolitan AAU in September 1922. In this meet she won the 70-yard dash and won the standing broad jump with a leap of over 8 feet. She then put on a demonstration of the 60-yard hurdles in which she equaled her personal best time of 9 seconds. Later in the month Camille competed in Newark Star Eagle's Girls Meet at Weequhic Park (NJ). In this meet Camille broke the world's record in the standing broad jump and the 60-yard hurdles. She equaled the American record in the 100-yard dash and finished 2nd in the 50-yard dash. Camille is a charter member of the Kean University Benisch Athletics Hall of Fame. Camille Sabie married George Malbrock.

Maybelle Gilliland was the daughter of William J. and Elizabeth J. Gilliland, of Bogota, New Jersey. Maybelle was born on January 23, 1906, and completed her junior year at Leonia High School (NJ) before the summer of 1922. At the Oaksmere Meet, Maybelle won both the 50 and 100-yard dash events. In the Paris Meet, Maybelle was entered in the 60-meters, the 100-yard dash, and a member of the 440-yard team. She failed to reach the finals in the first two events and the U.S. relay team was penalized after finishing second and given fourth place. Maybelle's high school coach and assistant team coach, Suzanne Becker indicated that Maybelle was hampered in Paris by a knee injury. Maybelle continued to compete in track and field events after the meet in Paris. September 1923, AAU first National Track and Field Championships for women. Maybelle, running for the City Bank Club, set the record for the 100-yard dash. March 1924, AAU Indoor Championships at Madison Square Garden. Maybelle, running the 2nd leg, helped set a new world's record time in the 440-relay. Again representing the City Bank Club, the other relay team members were Marion McCartie, M. Hassard, and Karin Carlsson. In July 1925, Women's National AAU Track and Field Championships in Pasadena, California. Maybelle represented the Savage School (NYC) finishing 2nd in the 50-yard dash and 4th in the 100-yard dash. August 1927, Maybelle competed at a track and field meet for women at Weequahic Park, Newark, New Jersey for a chance to compete at the AAU National Championships at Eureka, California. Maybelle, representing the Paterson Recreation Club, finished second in the baseball throw. July 1928, Olympic track and field tryouts in Newark, New Jersey. Running for the Patterson Recreation Club, Maybelle placed 2nd in the 50-yard dash and finished 3rd in the 6th heat of the 100-meter dash. July 1930, Women's National AAU Track and Field Championships in Dallas, Texas. Maybelle was a member of the vaunted Millrose AA (NY) 440-yard relay team. In Dallas they set a new world's record time of 0:49.4. Team members included Jessie Cross, Carrie Jansen, and Loretta McNeil. July 1931, Women's National AAU Track and Field Championships in Dallas ,Texas. The Millrose AA team finished a disappointing 2nd in the 440-yard relay. January 1933, Maybelle retired from track competition. Miss Marion Burns, one of her coaches at Leonia High School said of Maybelle: "Her running stride was beautiful to watch. It was as smooth as poetry. You've heard of 'Marvelous Mildred Didrikson,' well, Miss Gilliland is certainly able to carry the Marvelous Maybelle label." Maybelle Gilliland married Clarence Cotterill in June 1936. Maybelle Gilliland Cotterill died in February 1971.

Floreida Burton Batson was born on November 20, 1900, in New Orleans, Louisiana, to Robert Percy and Emma Burton Batson and was team captain. Floreida graduated in 1921, from Rosemary Hall (now Choate Rosemary Hall) where she was active in field hockey, basketball, and track. At Rosemary hall, Floreida set the American record in both the 60-yard high hurdles with a time of 9 seconds, and the 100-yard low hurdles with a time of 14 2/5 seconds. Floreida attended Smith College where she played forward on the Freshman basketball team. While at Rosemary Hall, Floreida held the American record in both the 60-yard high hurdles with a time of 9 seconds, and the 100-yard low hurdles with a time of 14 2/5 seconds. These were also preparatory school records. Floreida Batson was captain of the US team. While training in Paris, Floreida sprained her ankle. At the meet, Floreida was a contestant in the 100-yard hurdles and a member of the 440-yard relay. During her heat for the 100-yard hurdles she established a new world's record, but finished 4th in the finals. The US team was penalized in the 440-yard relay. In 1923, she married William Joseph Gibbens, Jr. They had two daughters. Floreida Batson Gibbens died in 1996.

Elizabeth Gertrude Stine was born on August 5, 1905, to Thomas Arthur and Consuelo Amelia Frost Stine of Bogota, New Jersey. Elizabeth completed her sophomore year at Leonia High School in the summer of 1922. According to a newspaper article in 1922, her goal was "to be the world's greatest all-round woman athlete." At the Oaksmere Meet, Elizabeth broke the world's record in the hop, skip, and jump. She also won the running broad jump and placed 3rd in the 100-yard dash. Elizabeth celebrated her 16th birthday aboard the Aquatania on August 5, 1922. In the Paris Meet, Elizabeth was a contestant in the running broad jump, and a member of the 440-yard relay. Elizabeth finished 2nd in the running broad jump, and the US team was penalized in the 440-yard relay. Elizabeth continued to compete in track and field events after the games in Paris. July 1925, Women's National AAU Track and Field Championships in Pasadena, CA. Elizabeth represented the Savage School (NYC) winning the high jump with a height of 4'10' and placed 4th in the broad jump. July 1926, Women's National AAU Track and Field Championships in Philadelphia, PA. Elizabeth was a member of the Patterson Recreation Club (NJ) finishing second in the running high jump. In June 1934, Elizabeth Stine Glasier was among the invited dignitaries at the Bergen County Record's Women's Outdoor State Track Championship at Hackensack, N.J. Elizabeth Gertrude Stine married Charles Fredick Glasier on May 29, 1931. They had a son. Elizabeth Stine Glasier died on November 15, 1993.

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