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SOC 448: Community Organization & Advocacy (Huisman): Find Articles

Finding Your 4 Articles

D. Peer-Reviewed Journal Article and Reflections: 2 due on Feb. 21; 2 due on March 4.
(p. 5 of your syllabus) 
You will locate and include four (4) peer reviewed journal article related to your area of interest. Three of these must be targeted to specific topics, and the fourth is a journal article of your choice.

  1. Leadership Principles
  2. Social Justice
  3. Challenges in Leadership
  4. [your choice] 

Any, or all of these, would be a great start!

Still not finding anything? Try Discovery Service! It searches everything we have.
(We recommend that you only search Discovery if you are not having luck with the above databases, as it can be quite overwhleming.) 

When accessing our databases, you will be prompted to log in. Enter your Username and Password. 

Username: Your username is your full CC email address, which should be your   firstname.lastname@my.columbiasc.edu.
Password: Unless you have changed it, your password should be Koala (with a capital "K"), plus the last 4 digits of your SSN. 

Example
Username: jane.doe@my.columbiasc.edu 
Password: Koala1234

** Please Note: If you are refused the first time, please log in a second time. (Sometimes it takes the system time to recognize you.)

Having trouble? Click the Contact Us tab on this guide. 

  1. Make sure the Full-Text and Scholarly/Peer-Reviewed boxes are check-marked.
    (For a quick refresher on what "scholarly/peer-reviewed" entails, click here.) 
  2. Enter 2 or 3 Keywords into the Search box, making sure to type "AND" between them. 
    This is the tough part: knowing what Keywords to put in. Here's some advice. 
    1. Brainstorm for Keywords using your class text, the assignment description and other related readings.
    2. Brainstorm as a group. 
    3. Ask Dr. Huisman.
    4. Watch the video below. 
  3. Only use articles with a publication date that falls within the time-frame Dr. Huisman will accept. (Ex. the last 12 months, the last 3 years, etc.)

Example:

 

Do you have a specific journal or journal article citation you need to look up? Simply enter the title of the journal. If we carry it in full-text, it will appear in the results list. You can then search within that publication. 

eJournal Finder
Limit Your Results

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Historical Case Analysis

E. Historical Case Analysis and Reflection: Due March 28.
(p. 6 of your syllabus) 
You will analyze a case study or example of community planning/organization/development taken from current or historical literature. You will submit an 8-10 page paper, APA format, demonstrating through analysis an understanding of community practice.

Any, or all of these, would be a great start!

For a more historical perspective, try these:

Still not finding anything? Try Discovery Service! It searches everything we have. 
(We recommend that you only search Discovery if you are not having luck with the above databases, as it can be quite overwhleming.) 

  1. Make sure the Full-Text and Scholarly/Peer-Reviewed boxes are check-marked.
    (For a quick refresher on what "scholarly/peer-reviewed" entails, click here.) 
  2. Enter 2 or 3 Keywords into the Search box, making sure to type "AND" between them. 
    This is the tough part: knowing what Keywords to put in. Here's some advice. 
    1. Brainstorm for Keywords using your class text, the assignment description and other related readings.
    2. Brainstorm as a group. 
    3. Ask Dr. Huisman.
    4. Watch the video below. 
  3. Only use articles with a publication date that falls within the time-frame Dr. Huisman will accept. (Ex. the last 12 months, the last 3 years, etc.)

Something good to start out with might be:    "case study" AND community organizations
But try other words and word-combinations. 

Q. Why is case study in double-quotes?
A. We want to be sure that the database gives us back articles specifically about case studies. In other words, we want those words to appear exactly as they are - together.   

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Researching Your Organization

Much of the information Dr. Huisman wants you to find about your organization can be found on their web site, usually in the About/About Us or Our History tabs. But for some of the information, you may need to do some serious digging around on the site; you may need to look at/through their publications and reports. Here are some tips to help you:

Q. I'm not sure what organization I want to focus on. I know I'm interested in organizations that specialize in [_your topic_] but how can I find them?
A. Use Google's   site:    operator!

Type in:       site:org [your topic]               Ex. site:org domestic violence

Within the Google results will be plenty of organizations that deal with domestic violence.